Belgium racing

Het Volk - Saturday's Het Volk Classic was won by Nick Nuyens (Quick Step), who slipped away late on in the race to win alone after many of the big hitters in the final break couldn't decide who was going to chase him. The 25 year old rider was not even in the favourites list - However one of the hot favourites, Tom Boonen, was delighted for his team mate.

Kuurne-Bruxelles-Kuurne - George Hincapie (Discovery Channel) has waited a long time to win a race in Belgium, usually the bridesmaid and rarely the bride. The tall New Yorker has been one of Lance Armstrong's right hand men for all of his Tour victories. This time Hincapie escaped in the final 10 kilometres and easily outsprinted his breakaway partner, Kevin Van Impe (Chocolade Jacques), to win the 58th edition of the 190km Belgian semi-classic Kuurne-Bruxelles-Kuurne on Sunday. It's Discovery's first win of the season.

London racing

Lewis Atkins (Glendene/Biketrax) won the Hillingdon winter series 2004/5 despite crashing out of the final race with only 250 metres to go. The highly talented junior rider has won several of the 17 rounds of the Twickenham CC organised event, beating many seasoned seniors along the way. He also won the series last year.

Policeman sold stolen bikes on eBay

A senior policeman is facing jail after selling stolen bikes on eBay. According to London's Evening Standard:

Inspector David Humphrey used the internet auction site to sell hand-made bicycles worth hundreds of pounds to unsuspecting bidders.

He was found guilty of nine counts of handling stolen goods and two of false accounting after the owner of one of the stolen items recognised his £700 custombuilt cycle being advertised. Inside Humphrey's Wimbledon home, police found 10 bicycles, ranging in price from £700 to £1,500. Humphrey, who was with the Royal Parks Constabulary for 20 years before his arrest, claimed he bought the bikes for cash and in good faith from Brick Lane market.

Please let us know if you have bought a bike from him.

Science in Sport (SiS) to back team GB

The Sports nutrition specialists are to be the GB Cycling Team’s official supplier of sports drinks and sports nutrition products in a new four-year deal worth £250,000, which will take the team to the Beijing Olympics.

SiS was the brainchild of keen sportsman Tim Lawson, a nutritional expert who formed the company in 1992. Today, SiS’s main brands include GO, a hypotonic energy drink; PSP22, a high energy drink; GO Bar, a nutritious energy bar and REGO, a recovery drink. The company has developed close links with cycling and its products have been endorsed by Chris Boardman and Bradley Wiggins, both Olympic Pursuit champions.

Science in Sport’s Peter Slater said:

“Science in Sport is extremely pleased to be entering into this partnership with the Great Britain Cycling Team. Over the years we have had strong individual links with many of Britain’s leading cyclists, which has enabled them to perform at the highest level. Refuelling and remaining hydrated are critical nutritional factors that every cyclist faces. Working closely with the riders, coaches and staff in one of the most demanding endurance sports will enable us to further enhance our statement as leaders in sports nutrition, as well as demonstrating our continued commitment to sport. The announcement of this partnership follows our recent accolade as a Sport BrandLeader for making considerable impact on the sports world by energising the stars of the future."

GB Team Performance Director Dave Brailsford said:

“SiS has a really strong background in cycling and their understanding of our sport, combined with their technical knowledge, will keep us at the cutting edge of sports nutrition technology. We share SiS’s belief that Nutrition is a key determinant of athletic performance. In order to win Olympic medals our riders have to get their nutritional strategy spot-on and in entering this partnership with Science in Sport, I believe that we will be making a significant step towards optimising the GB Cycling Team’s performances."

Hamilton will try to proove test 'inaccurate'

Tyler Hamilton and his attorney will, this week, attempt to prove the blood-transfusion test - for which he tested positive no less than three times - is not always accurate. The test has been around for 25 years but the American strongly denies any wrong doing. His hearing with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency begins on Monday in a Denver law office in his home state of Colorado and continues until Wednesday. A verdict is expected by March 12.